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Monrovia Medical Unit Is Aiding Health Care Workers In Fight Against Ebola


Op-Ed Contributor


Published on 25 November 2014

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by Deborah R. Malac

(WireNews)

WASHINGTON

Monrovia Medical Unit Was Built To Care For Health Workers Infected With Ebola
Monrovia Medical Unit Was Built To Care For Health Workers Infected With Ebola

The United States has been engaged in fighting the Ebola outbreak since the first cases were reported in March and on November 5, as part of our whole-of-government response to the Ebola crisis, we opened the Monrovia Medical Unit, which will provide care to any health care workers who become infected with Ebola while treating patients.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf joined Rear Admiral Scott F. Giberson and I to mark the inauguration of the Monrovia Medical Unit (MMU), a 25-bed field hospital located in Margibi County, Liberia.

Constructed by the U.S. Department of Defense and staffed by the men and women of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, the Monrovia Medical Unit is a true representation of the continuing momentum in the fight against the Ebola virus. The U.S. government has already deployed more than 2,500 personnel to West Africa, making this the largest-ever U.S. government response to a global health crisis.

While the MMU represents only one milestone in the ongoing fight against the Ebola virus, it is a vital piece of the puzzle.

The addition of the MMU’s 25-bed field hospital is but one component of a broader effort to protect both international and Liberian health care workers who have courageously volunteered to treat Ebola patients in Monrovia and across the country. The MMU is currently treating three Liberian health care workers.

These are the true heroes in our battle with the Ebola virus, those who are winning the fight day-by-day and patient-by-patient.

The fight against Ebola, however, is far from over and the need for additional health care personnel is critical.

If you are a qualified medical professional and want to volunteer to work in West Africa, click here for more information.

Stay current on efforts by the international community to fight the Ebola virus. Tune in to the U.S. Department of State’s new online audio series on the Ebola outbreak. Each episode will feature key individuals working within the international community to share updates and highlight the work that is being done to fight the outbreak.


This blog post by U.S. Ambassador to Liberia Deborah R. Malac originally appeared on the State Department website on November 24.


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Posted 2014-11-25 19:00:00